Supporting Adult Learners

VSAC helps Vermont adults access learning opportunities

If you’re a Vermont adult looking for help to go back to college or a training program to continue your learning—and you don’t already have a bachelor’s degree—you’ve come to the right place. VSAC’s Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) is a federally funded TRIO program that helps adults access college and career training services.

Our EOC counselors can help you:

MAKE A FREE APPOINTMENT WITH A VSAC EOC COUNSELOR

The first step in getting help is to meet with a counselor. Just call one of the numbers below, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., to set up an appointment with a counselor near you:

  • 654-3793 in the Burlington area
  • 786-8840 in the Rutland or Bennington areas
  • 877-961-4369 statewide

There is no charge for this appointment.

Will you be meeting to get help with financial aid for Vermont adult learning opportunities?

If you're meeting to receive help with financial aid applications, you’ll need to bring all the information required to complete the applications.

What to bring if you’re 24 years old or older

Depending on your specific situation, this may include:

  • Your 2015 and 2016 federal 1040 tax returns and W2s (if filed)
  • Your monthly Reach Up Family Assistance and Food Stamps/Vermont 3 Squares (if applicable)
  • Any child support paid and/or received in 2015 (if applicable)
  • The current balance of your checking and savings accounts
  • Your home’s value and the amount you still owe on your mortgage (if you own a home)
  • Your farm’s value and debt (if you own a farm)
  • Your business value and debt (if you own a business)
  • The value of any investments and any investment-related debt (if you own any investments such as a rental property)
  • Your email address and password

What to bring if you’re under 24 years old

If you are under 24 years old, you may be considered a dependent student when it comes to financial aid. This means that you will need to provide your parent(s)’ financial information as well as your own when applying for financial aid. And the amount of financial aid you receive will be based on your whole family’s finances.

Please bring the following documents:

  • Your parents’ required items in the list above (not all may apply to your parents’ situation)
  • Your 2015 and 2016 federal 1040 tax returns and W2s (if applicable)
  • Your parents’ 2015 and 2016 federal tax returns and W2s (if they did not file, then their Social Security Numbers)
  • Your parents’ dates of birth
  • The date of your parents’ marriage, divorce, and/or separation (if applicable)
  • Please consider bringing a parent to the appointment or asking that a parent be available by phone during the appointment.

If you’re under 24: Find out if you’re considered a dependent student

Determining if you’re an independent or dependent student is an important step. To find out, answer the questions below. If you answer “yes” at any 1 of these questions for the 2017-2018 academic year, you are considered an independent student.

1.

Were you born before January 1, 1994?

Yes

No

2.

As of today, are you married? Answer “yes" if you are separated, but not divorced.

Yes

No

3.

At the beginning of the 2017–2018 school year, will you be working on a master’s or doctorate program (such as an MA, MBA, MD, JD, PhD, EdD, or graduate certificate)?

Yes

No

4.

Are you currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training?

Yes

No

5.

Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces?

Yes

No

6.

Do you have children who will receive more than half of their support from you between July 1, 2016, and June 30, 2017?

Yes

No

7.

Do you have dependents (other than your children or spouse) who live with you and who receive more than half of their support from you, now and through June 30, 2017?

Yes

No

8.

At any time since you turned age 13, were both your parents deceased, were you in foster care, or were you a dependent or ward of the court?

For question 8, answer “yes" if at any time since you turned age 13:

  • You had no living parent (biological or adoptive) even if you are now adopted; or
  • You were in foster care, even if you are no longer in foster care today; or
  • You were a dependent or ward of the court, even if you are no longer a dependent or ward of the court today. For federal student aid purposes, someone who is incarcerated is not considered a ward of the court.

The financial aid administrator at your school may require you to provide proof that you were in foster care or that you were a dependent or ward of the court.

Yes

No

9.

As determined by a court in your state of legal residence, are you or were you an emancipated minor?

Yes

No

10.

As determined by a court in your state of legal residence, are you or were you in legal guardianship?

Yes

No


For questions 11—13:

 

Homeless" means lacking fixed, regular, and adequate housing, which includes living in shelters, motels, or cars, or living temporarily with other people because you had nowhere else to go.

 

 

 

Unaccompanied" means you are not living in the physical custody of your parent or guardian.

 

 

 

Youth" means you are 21 years of age or younger, or you are still enrolled in high school as of the day you sign this application.

 

 

11.

At any time on or after July 1, 2015, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?

Yes

No

12.

At any time on or after July 1, 2015, did the director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?

Yes

No

13.

At any time on or after July 1, 2015, did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were self-supporting and at risk of being homeless?

Yes

No


For students unable to provide parental information

Under very limited circumstances (for example, if your parents are incarcerated, if you have left home due to an abusive family environment, or if you do not know where your parents are and are unable to contact them), you may be able to submit your FAFSA without parental information. If you are unable to provide parental information, submit your FAFSA without parental data. You must follow up with the financial aid office at the college you plan to attend in order to complete your FAFSA.

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